Becoming a U.S. Citizen – Tests You Have to Take

May 23, 2016 | Citizenship

As a Miami immigration lawyer, I have had the privilege of representing individuals who are adjusting their immigration status in  order to become a U.S. citizen. I have had numerous questions about the kinds of test that one needs to take in order to obtain their U.S. citizenship in Miami. Below are some frequently asked questions.

How do I prepare for the U.S. Civics exam?
The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has prepared 100 potential questions for the history and government exam. These, with their answers, are published in advance, for anyone to see. You will have to memorize the answers to these questions—ideally all 100 of them. If you have any questions in regard to this, you may want to speak with an immigration attorney in Miami.

How many questions will I need to answer correctly?
You will  need to answer only six out of ten questions correctly in order to pass.  Again, if you have any questions in regard to this, you may want to speak with a Miami immigration lawyer.

Will I know what questions will be asked in the exam?
No. You  won’t know in advance which ten questions you’ll be aske. The USCIS official who interviews you gets to choose.

Are there any exceptions to sitting for the test?
Yes. The immigration authorities make exceptions for people are too old or have disabilities. Below are some of them:

a) Exception for Elder Applicants
If you are at least age 65 and have lived in the U.S. as a permanent resident for at least 20 years (these don’t need to be continuous years) when your file your citizenship application, you can take an easier version of the history and government exam. You will have to study only 20 questions. You’ll be asked ten of the questions and will need to answer six correctly in order to pass. You can also take the test in your native language if you need to. If you have any questions in regard to this, you may want to speak with an immigration lawyer in Miami, Florida.

b) Exception for Disabled Applicants
If you have a physical or mental disability that prevents you from learning the required concepts of U.S. history and government, you may qualify for a waiver. A doctor will have to fill out a form (N-648) explaining exactly what your disability is. Again, if you have any questions in regard to this, you should speak with an immigration lawyer in Miami.

How do I prepare for the English exam? What can I expect?
You will need to demonstrate your English skills at your citizenship interview. The USCIS officer who interviews you will of course address you in English, and observe how well you respond to questions and instructions. The officer will also ask you to read a short passage, and to write a sentence that he or she says aloud (dictates) to you. There are classes available at local adult schools to help you master English. Again, if you have any questions in regard to this, you may want to speak with a Miami immigration lawyer.

If you have would like more information about the U.S. Civics test, please contact Miami immigration lawyer The Law Office of Tatiane M. Silva, P.A., Esq. at (305) 895-2500 or visit our website at tmsilvalaw.com.